Join a Trip!


Join us on an adventure! in the USA or Internationally. Several trips are cost-shared, exploratory where trip participants are experienced, capable of self-support, and willing to do what needs done in order to make it down the river, even if it involves a strenuous portage! Other trips are escorted and mellower with class II to III rapids. For the boater that wants a more relaxed pace or has less experience.

USA options during the summer: Dolores, Rogue, NW Circuit. If interested in USA private cost/work shared trips please email me at lacey2u@sbcglobal.net

Click on the tabs below to find out more about our International trips! (Peru, Mexico, Ecuador)

This winter we are returning to Ecuador, scroll down for details.

Multiple possibilities in Mexico for 2017 scroll down for details:

In Peru, we support local Peruvian communities, Peruvian guides, Peruvian outfitters and Rio Marañón conservation projects. Experienced class IV rowers, row your own raft! If less experienced,no worries, opportunity to row in the calmer sections. This generous offer is made possible by our Peruvian hosts. There are also slots for experienced kayakers and your non rowing friends – scroll down please for info.

Hey Ladies! join my Facebook group at Women’s International Water Expeditions.

PERU - Rio Marañón 15-Day

“Row Your Own”Rio Marañón

September 24 to October 8, 2017 (15D/14N)

October 14 to October 28, 2017 (15D/14N)

Have the best of both worlds. Leave the logistics, food planning, and cooking to someone else. While you show up with only your sleeping bag and get to row a boat down the magnificent Marañón (kayaks available too). Everything is supplied, but experienced rowers have the opportunity to row a raft. Not an experienced rower – no problem! each boat will carry up to three guests, one of which can row the raft or the class V Peruvian guide will step up and row the raft. Feel comfortable running big water class IV+ rapids, then you can row yourself and a few passengers through the big rapids. This is a unique opportunity found nowhere else thanks to our Peruvian hosts. Kayakers welcome too! Rent a kayak down there or bring your own and have us help you with logistics. This truly is the best of both worlds

We invite you to join us on this remarkable journey into the upper Amazon River. Our travels will take us into one of the deepest river canyons in the world, with miles of red vertical walls rising directly from the riverbed. On this 15-day journey one of the many incredible spots is Cascada Muro Poso, a 400+ meter waterfall coming almost directly into the river. We also explore a pre-Incan pueblo complex, which includes spectacular overlooks. This trip offers swimming in an intriguing series of bedrock waterfall pools at Quebrada Aguablanca. The majority of camps are on expansive white sand beaches. As time allows we will also take excursions to verdant creeks, scenic grottos, and slot canyons.

The Marañón River is a major tributary of the Amazon River. This alone makes it one of the most important rivers in Peru and the world. The Marañón has been declared a biodiversity hotspot of global importance as it has one of the highest levels of endemism in the world. It is alarming to realize that the upper Amazon River, with its unique dry-forest, the flora and fauna and the people whom support themselves from its nutrient-rich waters are all under threat, due to mega-dam projects. When you join this trip, you’ll be supporting the communities that we visit.

An additional benefit is that this expedition is fully supplied by professional Peruvian outfitters. We employ Peruvian guides and local Peruvian companies. Our expedition strives to maximize the positive effects of tourism on the host communities and minimize any negative effects; this includes ensuring that tourism does not divert resources away from Peruvians or the local communities.

A unique highlight of this expedition is the opportunity to interact with the remarkable inhabitants who live alongside the Maranon and maintain a lifestyle deeply connected to nature.  We’ll learn about their history, customs and lifestyle. We will also hear of their struggles with dam builders. This trip passes several of the 20 dam sites proposed for the Rio Marañón; Chadin Dos (a mega-dam) is in the latest planning stages. If the dams are built, the section of the river that the villages of Tupén and Mendán are located will likely be the first to be drowned by reservoirs.

An expedition on the upper Amazon is all about great expeditionary rafting. If you have recent class IV rowing experience you will have the opportunity to row a raft part of the time with one of the other participants or one of the professional Peruvian guides; you’ll be part of the team in camp and on the river, invited to participate in all activities and camp chores.

The average river volume this time of year is 5,000 CFS, but with rain it can double. We drop 2,500 feet, so it can be a wild ride. The first week has fairly mellow water, mostly class I and II, with a few class III´s, and one tougher rapid (Samosierra, a long class IV). There is more whitewater action in the second half of the trip (after Balsas), including a very exciting class IV+ (Linlin). A couple of these rapids are quite long, making them a bit more difficult than the toughest rapids on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

15-DAY ITINERARY

Day 1:                                                                                      Arrive, Welcome Dinner (D)

Hotel in Huanchaco

Fly into the city of Trujillo, Peru. Connections through Lima are available from many gateway cities. Our group will gather for a welcome dinner, introductions and pre-trip information. All participants will be provided a shared room at a hotel in the seaside community of Huanchaco, just outside of Trujillo. The double occupancy room is included in trip cost.

Day 2:                                              Peruvian Andes, Rio Marañón River Canyon (B+L+D)

Beach Camp at Chagual

We arise early and make our way to the put-in at Chagual. This transport leg of the adventure will take all day and into the early evening. We climb up some of the tallest mountains in the world, the Peruvian Andes. To then wind down into one of the deepest river canyons in the world, the Marañón. During our drive you will get an idea of the scale of this immense river corridor as we travel through several distinct zones, cloud farmlands high on the mountain, down into the dry forests of the Marañón River. A truck for the gear and a bus for our group. ~4 hours to Huamachuco and ~8 hours to Chagual.

Day 3:                                                                     Rigging Rafts, Launch (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Unnamed (III), Suchaca (III)

Rigging boats and getting on the water is the order of the day. The morning is spent inflating rafts and rigging; then we launch in the afternoon, and raft approximately 7 kilometers to camp. There will be an evening orientation to familiarize everyone with the schedule and camp procedures. .

Day 4:                                                                     Cañon Asconta and Sinchibin (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Hualango (III), Gansul (IV) 

The Rio Marañón is also known as “The Serpent of Gold” because its sediment is heavy in gold. Today we float past a 30+ year old gold mine. Maybe not the most scenic, but interesting history. There are few roads or bridges crossing the river and we may be lucky enough to witness a cable car in use. On several past trips we have seen the locals transporting mules across the river, the animals are slung onto the cable car – quite the sight! Camp in the beautiful Cañon Asconta, across from the tall cliffs of Sinchibin Canyon.

Day 5:                                                       Muro Poso Waterfall, Red Wall Canyon (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Crisneias (III)  

Today we arise early because we need to cover many kilometers. We continue with mellow water for the majority of the day and float by many interesting and alluring sights: busy pueblo of Calemar, Red Wall Canyon, Rio Choclo and Chon Chon. We aim to cover enough kilometers to camp in sight of the 400+ meter drop at Muro Poso.

Day 6:                                                                      Deepest Section of Canyon (B+L+D)
Rapids of Note: Llanten (III)

After many photos of Cascada Muro Poso we head toward the deepest section of the canyon. The Llanten rapid area is one of the deepest sections of our 15-day expedition, astoundingly measured at a depth of 3050 meters (~10,000 feet). We stop to scout Llanten rapid the first technical rapid of our trip. Camp this evening will be close to the fun and challenging Samosierra rapid.

Day 7:                                                                                        Samosierra Rapid (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Samosierra (long IV) Unnamed (III)

Stop to scout Samosierra rapid. One of the biggest and longest technical rapids of the entire expedition. Samosierra entrance is class III, which then turns into a long class IV (large waves and “must-make” moves), which then slowly mellow into a class II rapid. The entire length of this action-packed rapid is a little over 3 miles! Camp before Balsas.

Day 8:                                                    Balsas, Pre-Incan Ruins at Playa El Cura (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Bridge (III), Wall Move (III)

A short visit to the town of Balsas where we may resupply with fresh fruits and vegetables. We may also stop at the regional headquarters of Odebrecht (Brazilian dam builder). Last we heard, the office in Balsas had been closed; let’s find out!  In the afternoon explore the Pre-Incan archeological site of Playa El Cura. These are ruins of ancient adobe houses, stone structures, and a guard tower high on a bluff overlooking the river. It would be a shame to lose this remains of ancient history to a reservoir before it has even been fully unearthed and studied by archeologists and academia. Camp just past “wall move” rapid.

Day 9:                                                                     Whitewater, Playa La Mushka (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Two Channels (III), El Choclon (III), Yangas (III), Mendan (III), Hoodoos (III), unnamed (III), La Mushka (III)

One of the busiest whitewater days, seven named class III’s (if the water is up may even be class IV’s) There are also many class II’s. We will have whitewater action a good part of the day until we arrive at our charming beach camp close to the pueblo of Tupén Grande. Camp tonight on the inviting white sands of Playa La Mushka.

Day 10:                    Visit Pueblo Tupén Grande, Fruit and Cacao Plantation (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Tupén Grande (IV), Chipche (III)

Short morning hike to town through picturesque fruit and coca plantations and trees heavy with oranges, mangos, bananas and coconuts where we will be welcomed into a pueblo for a locally made lunch of soup and cassava (yuca). The children of the village may enjoy a soccer game with their exotic visitors (us gringos). After lunch, return to our rafts to continue through fun class III’s and one class IV rapid to end our day on the beach of Playa San Lucas.

Day 11:                                          Whitewater, Chadin Dos Dam Site, Magdelana (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: San Lucas (IV), Playa El Inca (IV), 3 unnamed (III’s) 

The day starts with a bang at San Lucas rapid. Once the water slows the canyon walls narrow as we float through the proposed Chadin Dos dam site. Marvel at the beauty, yet be dismayed by the potential dam site! Whitewater action starts up again at Playa El Inca and continues to our camp alongside Magdelana Rapid. This evening learn about the Peruvian and International conservation movements to save this fabulous river corridor from the proposed dams.

Day 12:                                                                        Whitewater, Linlin Rapid (B+L+D)

Magdelana (IV), unnamed (III’s), Wall (III), Linlin (IV), Totora (IV), Saura (III) 

The day starts with the whitewater rush of the class IV Magdelana rapid. Next run several class III’s and by mid-afternoon we arrive at the most challenging rapid of the entire trip, the long class IV+ Linlin rapid. We stop and scout our line. Everyone has the option to take photos or walk this rapid if they do not feel comfortable running it. More fun technical rapids lie downstream. By early evening we arrive to the scenic camp alongside Cerro Cunarnia creek.

Day 13:        Scenic Wonders of Bedrock Waterfalls, Amazon Cave, Sandstone (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Palaguas (III) 

Have your camera ready today! Up early to rig the boats and get on the water headed for additional striking natural scenery. In the cool of the morning hike to the geologic phenomenon of Quebrada Aguablanca. The creek drops off the plateau above, forming a series of waterfalls perfect for swimming and wading. After spending time at the cascadas we row to another fabulous wonder of the upper Amazon River (a spectacular river level cavern). Continuing down river it becomes apparent we are entering the transition zone between Andean dry-forest and Amazon jungle. Witness red sandstone walls lined with lush riparian vegetation and trees filled with birds. Camp will be on a scenic sandstone river bend, perfect for reflecting on our river journey.

Day 14:                                                                         Take-out, Farewell Dinner (B+L+D)

Rapids of Note: Chinuña (III)

Hotel in Jaén

We arise early for a short row to take-out at Puerto Malleta. We will clean, de-rig, break down and load all equipment into the cargo truck (this will take several hours). After the equipment is taken care of we ride for three hour to Jaén. A shower awaits you at the hotel in Jaén. In the evening enjoy a farewell celebratory dinner with everyone. All participants will be provided a shared room at a comfortable hotel in the city of Jaén. The double occupancy room is included in trip cost.

Note: Do not book airline tickets home for today, as we will not arrive to Jaén in time to catch flights.

Day 15:                                                                                    Departure from Jaén

Make your travel arrangements back home for today. If you have to return home quickly, then make arrangements to fly out of the city of Jaén today (making a connecting flight through Lima). An alternative route home is to purchase a public bus ticket from Jaén to Chiclayo (approximately 4 hours), where you can then catch a connecting flight through Lima to home.

Note on Itinerary:

Although we do our very best to adhere to the schedule above, this itinerary is subject to change for numerous reasons beyond our control including weather, river levels and terrain conditions.

Further Excursions in northern Peru:

Consider extending your stay in northern Peru. You can travel east to Cuispes (reserve a room at La Posada de Cuispes) and take a trek through the cloud forest to waterfalls. In Chachapoyas, you will find excellent accommodations, restaurants and tours. I recommend a full-day tour of the Pre-Incan ruins of Kuelap. Don’t miss the hike to Cascada Gocta. Maybe you’re interested in the Amazon Jungle? Then head further east to Tarapoto and Yurimaguas. Or how about some R&R in the beach town of Chiclayo. These are just a few of the things to do in northern Peru!

WHAT’S INCLUDED

  • High quality rafting equipment and self-bailing rafts
  • Safety and professional river procedures
  • The best Peruvian class V river guides
    • Internationally trained, Swift Water Rescue and Wilderness First Responder courses
    • last year one was even a trained chef!
  • Peruvian safety kayaker
  • Professional First aid kit
  • Satellite Phone and rescue procedures
  • All arrangements in the field and on the river by professional river guides
  • 2 hotel nights (double occupancy)
    • Huanchaco
    • Jaén
  • All meals during the expedition which are identified in the itinerary (B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner).
  • Welcome dinner in Huanchaco
  • Farewell dinner in Jaén
  • Ground transportation
    • Trujillo to Chagual (put-in)
    • Puerto Malleta (take-out) to Jaén
  • Personal river gear:
    • PFD
    • Helmet
    • A shared large dry bag (3.8 L) for every 2 customers
  • Personal camp gear:
    • A shared 3 / 4 man tent for every 2 customers
    • Sleeping pad
    • Camp chair

THE EXTRAS

  • Dedicated Peruvian gear raft to help carry some of the expedition equipment
    • so your raft load will be a bit lighter
  • Experienced English speaking facilitators and bi-lingual guides
    • who will facilitate your entire adventure
  • Your entire trip arranged!
    • no stress, just arrive and enjoy the ride!
    • everything from transport, to meals, to local knowledge is taken care of
    • a percentage of trip cost goes to support local communities
  • Know that you are important to the local riverside communities we visit
    • through your involvement in river conservation
  • We employ local
    • outfitters, guides, additional support services
    • in order to support the Peruvian tourism industry
  • Know that you are accompanied by a passionate and dedicated team of Peruvian guides
    • who are trained to international standards
    • who don’t just paddle for work – they paddle for the love of it!

NOT INCLUDED

  • Sleeping bag
  • Insurance of any kind, including medical evacuation insurance
  • Hotels in Lima or other cities not on itinerary and meals not identified in the itinerary
  • Tips and extra spending or services not described in the itinerary

PERUVIAN GUIDES AND EQUIPMENT

This trip is fully supported by Peruvian owned and operated companies founded in 1978! For over 35 years they have explored, accomplished first descents and opened several Peruvian white water rivers to the world.

TRIP COORDINATOR

Lacey Anderson is a river guide with over 20 years’ experience guiding the rivers of California, the USA desert southwest, Mexico, and Peru. She has rowed the Rio Marañón many times over the last five years. She is an ambassador and contributing author for NRS . A number of articles have been written about Lacey; check them out in Canoe & Kayak, American Whitewater, Paddling with Purpose, and NRS

ECUADOR

ECUADOR

December, 2017 through January, 2018 – Escorted – Price depends on services provided

Join me on an escorted self-support trip to Ecuador this winter. You make all the flight arrangements and get your boating equipment down to Tena or Baeza and I’ll help with the rest. Not sure that you can travel with your equipment? Purchase one of Neil’s “International Travel” cataraft packages. These are the same boats we took down to Ecuador in 2016 and they work great. In fact, there is one package down there just waiting for our return! It may be available as a rental in 2017.

The rivers will be mostly day trips with a return to town every night, so food is on you, but you can eat well on less than $10/day. For a small fee, I will arrange your lodging in a comfortable hostel, plan and lead river trips including the transport, and facilitate transport between boating areas as required.

Ecuador is one of the best boating destinations overseas. This South American country is relatively easy to get to with a variety of airlines providing service into Quito and Guayaquil. Lodging and food is very affordable. Transport is easy with 4-door trucks serving as taxis. Money is a no-brainer, everything is in U.S. Dollars! And the rivers? Fantastic! Everything from placid jungle floats to Class V+ kayak-only runs. For us rafters, there is a wide variety of runs in several parts of the country ranging from big-water Class III to creeky Class IV+.

Weather and water permitting, here are some of the rivers we may be able to run. The descriptions are my impressions from running them in 2016, often at different water levels.

  • Rio Hollin – technical Class III increasing to big-water Class III+/IV overnight
  • Rio Jondachi (lower) – technical Class III+ into the larger volume Hollin
  • Rio Jatanyacu – open big-water Class III/III+ at medium/high water
  • Rio Misahualli (Cotundo) – tight, technical Class IV+ creeking
  • Rio Misahualli (El Reten) – tight, technical Class IV creeking
  • Rio Misahualli (middle) – open Class II small river
  • Rio Anzu (Coatayacu) – tight Class IV to begin, tapers to open Class III+
  • Rio Anzu (lower) – wide open Class III tapers to Class II
  • Rio Piatua – tight, technical Class IV at lower water

I’m hoping to explore some different rivers around the country as well.

  • Aguarico Valley
    • Rio Chingual
    • Rio Aguarico
    • Rio Due
  • Santo Domingo
    • Rio Toachi
    • Rio Blanco
    • Rio Malaute
  • Pastaza Valley
    • Upper and lower Pastaza
  • Macas Area
    • Rio Upano (multi-day)
    • Rio Yukipa
    • Rio Seipa

MEXICO Rio Mayo

MEXICO Rio Mayo

August 5-13, 2017; 100 miles – Cost-Shared Expedition

Experience the beauty and big water of the Rio Mayo. The Mayo drainage is best known for Cascada Basaseachi, one of the highest and most spectacular waterfalls in North America. The shuttle will definitely be long, but we will visit the town of Alamos, one of the pueblo magicos (magical towns) of Mexico at the beginning and the end of the trip. Also called “The City of Portals,” Alamos was built by architects from the city of Andalucia, Spain. Because of this, this city’s beautiful architecture is a blend between the Spanish Baroque and the indigenous styles. This also puts us relatively close to the beaches along the Sea of Cortez and we may visit Playa Himalaya on our way back to Hermosillo and the border.

The section we will be running is from La Junta near the junction of the Rio Concheno and Rio Candamena which form the Rio Mayo to (hopefully) near San Bernardo where a dam is under construction. With luck (and rain!) we should have several thousand cfs in the Mayo, but this will still be an easier trip, likely with nothing over Class III and wonderful scenery. The most difficult aspect will be the shuttle, which will take two days from Alamos to the put-in and we may not even be able to reach the river and have to abandon the trip. In that case, we would likely run the Rio Aros/Yaqui from Natora to Sahuaripa. Because of this, the trip will be cost-shared, including the shuttle which must be paid even if we don’t get on the river.

Note: The pictures in the slideshow are from 2015 and there is a dam under construction at San Bernardo. This will flood much of the lower canyon and may make this run inaccessible or require a long paddle out across a reservoir. We are hoping that it will not be completed in 2016 and we can take out at the dam site or upstream at Ejido de Chorijoa. Taking out at Chorijoa we would miss the scenic section with the “pilares” down to San Bernardo, which would be a shame.

Trip Highlights:

  • Experience a river that few have ever seen – there have been only a few known descents of the upper part of this section, although day and overnight trips starting many kilometers downstream near the Rio Babanori used to be run by local outfitters
  • Amazing Scenery – see for yourself the incredibly beautiful canyons carved by the rivers of northern Mexico
  • A low-stress trip – nothing on the Rio Mayo should be over Class III, kick back and enjoy the scenery without fear of the rapids
  • Experience the local culture –Complete the trip with a stop in Alamos, one of the few magical towns (Pueblos Magicos) of Sonora

Rio Sirupa

MEXICO Rio Verde / Sirupa

August 16-24, 2017;

73 miles – 8 or 9-day Escorted Trip $350/PersonPLUS Shared Shuttle and Food

Experience the second descent (in inflatables) of the Rio Verde, then continue on the little known Rio Sirupa. The Verde is one of the headwater streams in the Yaqui drainage north of the famous Copper Canyon region in Chihuahua, Mexico. Neil and Lacey ran from Puente Verde outside of Matachic to the hot springs at Huapoca in 2013. The Rio Verde down to the confluence with the Rio Papagochic will likely be low and creeky Class II to III while the section of the Rio Sirupa below contains several Class IV rapids and probably 2 portages before reaching Cascada Sirupa. Cascada Sirupa may be anywhere from Class III to VI depending on flow and we may have to portage. This is an extremely beautiful desert canyon. Below Cascada Sirupa is mostly big water Class III. The hot springs at Huapoca are a fabulous way to end the trip.

Neil and Lacey have boated this section before and feel comfortable leading experienced boaters down this difficult stretch of river. Participants need to have at least Class IV boating experience, desert camping experience, have their own boating equipment, and be willing to portage in at least two spots. We may have an inflatable kayak and at least one cataraft package for rent (at additional cost) if you cannot transport your own equipment down to Mexico. The inflatable kayak will rent for $200 for the trip and the cataraft for $350 for the trip. The trip cost of $350/person covers Lacey and/or Neil to arrange shuttle, purchase food, and serve as leader(s) for the trip. In addition, participants will be responsible for their share of the shuttle and the food costs. We anticipate that total cost per participant will be on the order of $500 to $600 if they supply their own boat (see rental above). Participants should plan on bringing and additional $100 or so for incidentals such as food on the drive from and back to the border, and hotels before and after the trip.

Note: depending on the group size, experience, and vehicles, participants may be required to drive their own vehicles in Mexico. These added expenses for fuel and insurance are NOT included in the trip cost or group shared expenses.

Trip Highlights:

  • Experience a river that few have ever seen – there have been only two known descents of this section, although day trips out of Madera to a section just above the hot springs used to be run by local outfitters.
  • Amazing Scenery – see for yourself the incredibly beautiful canyons carved by the rivers of northern Mexico.
  • Swim in the thermally heated pools or enjoy the shower at Aguas Termales Huapoca.
  • Visit archaeological sites in the area after the trip!

Rio Mulatos

MEXICO Rio Mulatos

August 26-August 31 or (September 4), 2017; 45 to 150 miles – 6 to 10-day Escorted Trip $250-$350/Person PLUS Shared Shuttle and Food

The Rio Mulatos carves a spectacular canyon through multiple layers of rock, ranging from reds and oranges in the upper section to some pink shades in the Barranca Mulatos. The lower sections before the Rio Aros confluence are heavily vegetated (and quite green during the monsoons) with large bluffs eroded to form high rimrock headlands above the river. A few ranchettes are found along the river below the Barranca Mulatos, becoming more numerous near the confluence with the Aros. Although the entire Mulatos/Aros trip has spectacular scenery, the whitewater of the Mulatos is the highlight of the trip.

Click here for a more detailed itinerary.

In 2010, 2011, and again in 2015, Neil and Lacey put in near the town of Mulatos to run the Rio Mulatos and continue on the Rio Aros and Yaqui. In 2010 the estimated flow in the Rio Mulatos was around 50 cumecs (approximately 1,750 cfs) which was an average and ideal level for the Mulatos. In 2011, the flow at the put-in near Mulatos was only around 5 cms (less than 200 cfs)! It took 5 hard days to reach the confluence with the Aros, a distance that took 2 days with adequate water in 2010. Flows in 2015 were estimated at about 20 cms (700 cfs) at the start, but quickly rose to over 150 cms (5,000 cfs) which is quite high in the barranca, so, in the interest of safety we waited until it dropped to more reasonable levels (under 2,000 cfs) before continuing. This year we are hoping to run the Mulatos again at near optimal levels . We will probably take out at Natora after a 3 day run, but may continue down the lower Aros and Yaqui, depending on the group.

Participants should have extensive Class IV boating experience, desert camping experience, and their own boating equipment. Participants must also be comfortable running solid Class IV rapids without scouting. It is often impossible to stop and scout many of the rapids once we have entered the barranca. We may have at least one cataraft package for rent (at additional cost) if you cannot transport your own equipment down to Mexico. The fully rigged cataraft will rent for $350 for the trip. The trip cost of $250/person that covers Lacey and/or Neil to arrange shuttle, purchase food, and serve as leaders for the trip ($350 for the longer trip). In addition, participants will be responsible for their share of the shuttle and the food costs. We anticipate that total cost per participant will be on the order of $500 to $600 if they supply their own boat (see rental above). Participants should plan on bringing and additional $100 or so for incidentals such as food on the drive from and back to the border, and hotels in Sahuaripa before and after the trip. There is no option to do your own food on this trip and all boats must be light due to the potential for portages.

Note: depending on the group size, experience, and vehicles, participants may be required to drive their own vehicles in Mexico. These added expenses for fuel and insurance are NOT included in the trip cost or group shared expenses.

Trip Highlights:

  • Experience a river that few have ever seen – although this river is relatively close to the border, the difficulty of finding the right water level, difficulty of whitewater, and remoteness seems to keep many people from running it.
  • Amazing Scenery – see for yourself this incredibly beautiful canyon carved by the Rio Mulatos
  • Quality Whitewater – in the Barranca Mulatos there are several Class IV and many Class III rapids
  • Interact with the locals in Natora and possible sample some of the local Bacanora (tequila)

Rio Tutuaca

MEXICO Rio Tutuaca / Aros and (possibly) Yaqui

September 9-14 or 19, 2017; 65 to 170 miles – Cost-Shared Expedition

Experience a second descent (in inflatable craft) on the lower Rio Tutuaca (we did the first one in the summer of 2014!), then continue on the little known Rios Aros and Yaqui. The Tutuaca is one of the headwater streams in the Yaqui drainage north of the famous Copper Canyon region in Chihuahua, Mexico. Our trip in 2014 was likely the second descent, ever, of the lower Tutuaca! The section of the Tutuaca that flows through the “walls of the giants” is primarily Class II and III, but depending on water levels there is the possibility of one Class IV. When we reach the confluence with the Rio Sirupa, the flow will likely triple, quadruple, or more. This could make for some BIG water, be prepared for rapids up to Class IV. In 2014, the flow reached nearly 20,000 cfs as we boated the upper Rio Aros down to Natora! If people wish a longer trip, we could continue down the lower Aros/Yaqui for an additional 4-5 days.

Trip Highlights:

  • Experience a river that few have ever seen – there have been only two known descents of this section of the Rio Tutuaca.
  • Amazing Scenery – see for yourself the incredibly beautiful “walls of the giants” on the Rio Tutuaca and the impressive canyon carved by Rio Aros.
  • Experience the local culture – The friendly people of El Refugio will likely visit our camp and want photos of themselves on the boats!

Click here for a tentative itinerary and more trip details.

Upper Aros

MEXICO Lower Sirupa/Upper Aros

September 10-15, 2017; 50 river miles plus a horseback trip – Cost-Shared Expedition

Experience the beauty and big water of the Rio Sirupa and upper Rio Aros. The Sirupa is one of the headwater streams in the Yaqui drainage north of the famous Copper Canyon region in Chihuahua, Mexico. Neil and Lacey ran the upper Sirupa from Puente Verde outside of Matachic to the hot springs at Huapoca in 2013. The lower Sirupa below Huapoca is an intense Class V+ expedition with several likely portages for rafts. On this trip we will bypass the Class V+ section and run only the last ten miles or so of the Rio Sirupa (Class II-III), passing the Rio Tutuaca and continuing down the Rio Aros, taking out at Natora. This section of the Aros flows through a beautiful canyon and is primarily Class II and III, but depending on water levels could prove to be more difficult (Class IV). Although Neil and Lacey have boated the majority of this section at high water, this will likely be an exploratory low water trip with inflatable kayaks and pack rafts. We will be trying to hire locals to use their pack horses to return from Natora to El Refugio or El Cable. Be prepared to hike with your dry bag while the horses carry the boats!

Trip Highlights:

  • Experience a river that few have ever seen – this section of the Rios Sirupa and Aros has only seen a few visitors crazy enough to raft the river.
  • Amazing Scenery – see for yourself the incredibly beautiful canyons carved by the Rios Sirupa and Aros.
  • Experience the local culture – The friendly people of El Refugio will likely visit our camp and want photos of themselves on the boats!
  • Horse Shuttle – We hope to hire local cowboys in El Cable or El Refugio to shuttle the gear back from Natora using their horses.